Last edited by Bagis
Friday, July 31, 2020 | History

5 edition of Market-Based Approaches to Environmental Regulation (Foundations and Trends(R) in Microeconomics) found in the catalog.

Market-Based Approaches to Environmental Regulation (Foundations and Trends(R) in Microeconomics)

by Ted Gayer

  • 319 Want to read
  • 27 Currently reading

Published by Now Publishers Inc .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Environment law,
  • Microeconomics,
  • Business/Economics,
  • Business & Economics,
  • Business / Economics / Finance,
  • Economics - Microeconomics,
  • Business & Economics / Microeconomics

  • The Physical Object
    FormatPaperback
    Number of Pages140
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL8812004M
    ISBN 101933019379
    ISBN 109781933019376

    Theoretically, market-based approaches can achieve the same level of pollution reduction as command and control laws at a lower cost. In addition, market based approaches do not require the government to gather large amounts of information to develop regulations and standards, as do command and control laws.   Environmental Markets explains the prospects of using markets to improve environmental quality and resource conservation. It compares standard approaches to environmental problems using governmental management, regulation, taxation, and subsidization with a market-based property rights by:

    Market-based approaches, consensus-building, non-point-source regulations, and performance-based measures are all promising strategies for the second generation of . The two distinct approaches to environmental policy include direct regulation-sometimes called 'command and control' policies-and regulation by economic, or market-based incentives. This book is the first to compare the costs and outcomes of these approaches by examining realworld applications. In a.

      Environmental Markets explains the prospects of using markets to improve environmental quality and resource conservation. No other book focuses on a property rights approach using environmental markets to solve environmental problems. This book compares standard approaches to these problems using governmental management, regulation, .   This title was first published in Economists have had increasing success in arguing the merits of market-based approaches to environmental problems. By making polluting expensive, market-based approaches provide polluters with incentives to clean up, rather than mandates to stop polluting.


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Market-Based Approaches to Environmental Regulation (Foundations and Trends(R) in Microeconomics) by Ted Gayer Download PDF EPUB FB2

Market-Based Approaches to Environmental Regulation Article in Foundations and Trends® in Microeconomics 1(4) January with 58 Reads How we measure 'reads'. Market-based Approaches to Environmental Regulation reviews the economics literature of market-based environmental regulations and design issues for environmental taxes and cap-and-trade systems.

It begins by reviewing the economics literature on the theory of market-based environmental by: Abstract.

Upon hearing the term market-based approaches to (or economic incentives for) environmental protection, some people assume this means letting unfettered competition between unregulated private firms determine how clean our air or water will be, how much open space we will have, or how many fish stocks will be driven to by: Market-based approaches to environmental protection are premised on the idea that it is possible to confront pri- vate firms, individuals, and even other levels of governmentAuthor: Paul Portney.

book discusses this notion of “market failure,” and the envi-ronment is always the first illustration that is used.

Given the very necessary government role in protecting the environment, the real question becomes how best to do this. Market-based approaches to environmental protection are premised on the idea that it is possible to File Size: KB. 1 1 See “Voluntary Approaches," Environmental Policy Research Brief #1, European Union Research Network on Market-based Instruments for Sustainable Development, undated 1.

Introduction In the s and s most developed nations created a host of. Market-based instruments, partnerships and light-handed approaches The unpopularity of traditional environmental regulation was fuelled in part by the rise of neoliberal economists in the public domain during the s.

According to those working within this governance paradigm. Market-based Approaches to Environmental Regulation also discusses the U.S. experience with a number of regulatory approaches that are commonly characterized as market-based and describes the mix of market and non-market Cited by: Get this from a library.

Market-based approaches to environmental regulation. [Ted Gayer; John K Horowitz] -- Economists argue that policymakers should take advantage of market principles in designing environmental regulations.

Such market-based approaches - environmental taxes and cap-and-trade - use. and a more radical reform, and simple abandonment of regulation by environmental ministries in favor of voluntary regulation (which is covered more extensively elsewhere in this book).

Market-based approaches address an efficiency problem arising from the use of uniform standards. Since they first appeared on the scene more than 20 years ago, market-based approaches, such as the emission trading system to control acid rain, have become the tools of choice when trying to solve difficult environmental problems.

Book Description. This title was first published in Economists have had increasing success in arguing the merits of market-based approaches to environmental problems. By making polluting expensive, market-based approaches provide polluters with incentives to clean up, rather than mandates to stop polluting.

History. For example, although the use of new environmental policy instruments only grew significantly in Britain in the s, David Lloyd George may have introduced the first market-based instrument of environmental policy in the UK when a Fuel tax was levied in during his ministry.

Transferable permits. A market-based transferable permit sets a maximum level of. An Economic Assessment of Market‐Based Approaches to Regulating the Municipal Solid Waste Stream Chapter: (p) 11 An Economic Assessment of Market‐Based Approaches to Regulating the Municipal Solid Waste Stream Source: Moving to Markets in Environmental Regulation Author(s): Peter S.

Menell Publisher: Oxford University PressAuthor: Peter S. Menell. Market–Based Approaches to Environmental Policy Regulatory Innovations to the Fore Edited by Richard F.

Kosobud and Jennifer Zimmerman With the future of regulatory reform much in question, the search is on for more attractive, flexible, and cost–effective ways of meeting regulatory : Richard F.

Kosobud. Chapters include Robert Stavins on market-based environmental policy, Archon Fung on ¡°social markets,¡± and Cary Coglianese and David Lazer. The final section examines both the upside and the downside of the market-based approach to improving governance.

Contributors include Elaine Kamarck, John D. Donahue, Mark Moore, and Robert Behn. ISBN: OCLC Number: Description: xiv, pages ; 26 cm: Contents: Cost savings from the use of market incentives for pollution control / Robert C. Anderson [and others] --Development of an emissions reduction market system for northeastern Illinois / Roger A.

Kanerva and Richard F. Kosobud --An. Market-based environmentalism and the free market are not the same. Free-market policies, even with respect to the environment, would not have “environmental protection” per se as their central focus.

Instead the focus would be on resolving conflicts among human beings as they put natural resources to : Roy Cordato. Our topic was environmental regulation—in particular the long-standing debate over command and control versus market-based environmental regulation—and our discussions made us wonder: How could two scholars—one of us an economist, the other a lawyer—be so concerned about the same problem yet have such different perspectives.

Private law solutions and public regulatory approaches are also explored, including traditional command-and-control and market-based forms of regulation. The book not only shows how the law-and-economics framework can be used to protect the environment, but also to examine deeper questions involving environmental federalism and the Author: Michael G.

Faure, Roy A. Partain. Book Description. The two distinct approaches to environmental policy include direct regulation-sometimes called 'command and control' policies-and regulation by economic, or market-based incentives.

This book is the first to compare the costs and outcomes of these approaches by examining realworld applications.New Tools for Environmental Protection: Education, Information, most discussion of command-and-control and market-based approaches to environmental policy assumes the federal government develops regulations or sets up market mechanisms to control the behaviors of private firms.

climate has also changed in the United States since the.This collection of essays takes a critical look at this question, and evaluates whether the promises of market-based regulation have been butors put forth the ideas that few regulatory instruments are actually purely market-based, or purely prescriptive, and that both approaches can be systematically undermined by insufficiently.